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Projects

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The geophysics team has been working at Croome, near Pershore, in association with the National Trust.

 

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The successful firing of an experimental kiln took place in October 2009.

 

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SWAG were fortunate in 2008 to again be invited by the National Trust to take part in the National Archaeology Weekend activities in Croome Park (also see below). This time we were based at the Temple Greenhouse and assisted WHEAS in their excavation of a privy.

 

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Following SWAG's involvement in archaeology activity days at Croome Lanscape Park near Pershore, the National Trust invited us to embark on a project  involving a crossing point at the southern end of the Croome River.

 

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In 2004 SWAG completed a project to survey trackways and other earthworks on land administered by the Malvern Hills Conservatorsin an attempt to understand the ways in which the area has evolved through usage over the centuries

 

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The outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease in 2001 necessitated the identification of sites for mass burial pits and Throckmorton airfield was selected as the site for the Midlands. The archaeology of the area was recorded as work proceeded.

The project was carried out in association with Worcestershire County Council and Channel 4's Time Team. 

The Time Team episode is available to watch online here (there are several advertisements before the programme starts).

A county council summary of the project is available here

This project was carried out in association with Worcestershire County Council, prior to the start of construction work. Two areas were investigated - the Furzen Farm area, where evidence had previously been found of a Bronze Age cremation cemetary; and George Lane, where the bypass crossed the southern edge of a Late Iron Age and Romano-British settlement.

A county council summary of the project is available here

IEvidence of medieval ploughing remains in some fields in Worcestershire in the form of ridge and furrow. Although much of this has been lost over the last century numerous examples still survive. 

 

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